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Majestic Mexican War State of Louisiana to Zachary Taylor Medal

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Majestic Mexican War State of Louisiana to Zachary Taylor Medal

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Details

(1847) State of Louisiana to Major General Zachary Taylor medal. Bronze, 76.5 mm. Julian MI-25. About Uncirculated. One of the most majestic medals in the U.S. military medal series, its obverse dominated not by a portrait or even an eagle, but a mother pelican feeding its young. The obverse design is taken from the seal of the state of Louisiana, who presented this award medal to its native son, Zachary Taylor, for his efforts in the Mexican War. Taylor would soon become President, but this medal was never produced in large numbers. Since Charles Cushing Wright accomplished this medal, along with many of the U.S. Mint struck medals of the Mexican War era, this type is listed in Julian, but it was actually produced outside the Mint by the firm of H.E. Baldwin & Co., New Orleans silversmiths. Silver examples are very rare today (and tend to cost in the low five-figure range) and copper specimens like this are not significantly more common. John Ford owned two silver examples and likewise owned just two copper ones; they realized $4025 and $3450.

This one shows Wright's high-relief pelican and dynamic battle scene at Buena Vista beautifully. The surfaces are glossy and smooth, ruddy orange-brown with some hairlines that betray an ancient cleaning, not uncommon on this medals that saw little to no distribution within the collector community of the day. A little rim nicks above the second A of ZACHARY is noted but unimportant. Some little peripheral pits are natural, inborn in the thick cast planchet upon which these medals were struck. Ford's second silver example showed a substantial linear planchet flaw, suggesting the difficulty with which these planchets were made outside the Mint, and his second copper example showed an even greater ration of these peripheral planchet flecks than this one does. The reverse shows significant double striking, which suggests the effort it took to get these high relief dies to bring up their relief.

Far scarcer than the other Julian-listed medals of the Mexican War, this medal's distinctive designs have always made it a standout highlight in the series. This one is pedigreed to a collection built in the 1950s by a Southern industrialist, acquired by that collector from Fred Baldwin of Baldwin's in London. The black ink number 6105 is present on the edge at 6:00, matching it to other pieces from the now-unknown collection of American medals split up by Mr. Baldwin circa 1956. The silver Washington Before Boston medal sold by StacksBowers in March 2014 for $282,000 was originally from the same collection and bore a nearly identical blank ink number on its edge. 

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade RAW
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc Not Specified
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 30009

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

Description

Details

(1847) State of Louisiana to Major General Zachary Taylor medal. Bronze, 76.5 mm. Julian MI-25. About Uncirculated. One of the most majestic medals in the U.S. military medal series, its obverse dominated not by a portrait or even an eagle, but a mother pelican feeding its young. The obverse design is taken from the seal of the state of Louisiana, who presented this award medal to its native son, Zachary Taylor, for his efforts in the Mexican War. Taylor would soon become President, but this medal was never produced in large numbers. Since Charles Cushing Wright accomplished this medal, along with many of the U.S. Mint struck medals of the Mexican War era, this type is listed in Julian, but it was actually produced outside the Mint by the firm of H.E. Baldwin & Co., New Orleans silversmiths. Silver examples are very rare today (and tend to cost in the low five-figure range) and copper specimens like this are not significantly more common. John Ford owned two silver examples and likewise owned just two copper ones; they realized $4025 and $3450.

This one shows Wright's high-relief pelican and dynamic battle scene at Buena Vista beautifully. The surfaces are glossy and smooth, ruddy orange-brown with some hairlines that betray an ancient cleaning, not uncommon on this medals that saw little to no distribution within the collector community of the day. A little rim nicks above the second A of ZACHARY is noted but unimportant. Some little peripheral pits are natural, inborn in the thick cast planchet upon which these medals were struck. Ford's second silver example showed a substantial linear planchet flaw, suggesting the difficulty with which these planchets were made outside the Mint, and his second copper example showed an even greater ration of these peripheral planchet flecks than this one does. The reverse shows significant double striking, which suggests the effort it took to get these high relief dies to bring up their relief.

Far scarcer than the other Julian-listed medals of the Mexican War, this medal's distinctive designs have always made it a standout highlight in the series. This one is pedigreed to a collection built in the 1950s by a Southern industrialist, acquired by that collector from Fred Baldwin of Baldwin's in London. The black ink number 6105 is present on the edge at 6:00, matching it to other pieces from the now-unknown collection of American medals split up by Mr. Baldwin circa 1956. The silver Washington Before Boston medal sold by StacksBowers in March 2014 for $282,000 was originally from the same collection and bore a nearly identical blank ink number on its edge. 

Additional

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade RAW
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc Not Specified
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 30009

Related Blog Article(s)

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

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