INVENTORY

Ca. 1860 State Department Lifesaving Medal by Emanuel Leutze. Julian LS-1.

No one pays more!

For high quality Washington medals. If you have rare or top condition Washington-
iana for sale or trade, contact us!

Ca. 1860 State Department Lifesaving Medal by Emanuel Leutze. Julian LS-1.

In stock

SKU: 18012

$775.00

Details

(ca. 1860) U.S. State Department Lifesaving medal. Bronze, 67 mm. Julian LS-1. Choice Mint State. Unawarded. Dies by Emanuel Leutze. A very scarce early US Mint-struck lifesaving medals, struck from dies by the man famous for his painting Washington Crossing the Delaware. The obverse depicts one of the most impressive eagle designs in all of American numismatics, while the reverse depicts a sailor rescuing another from a shipwreck, with rough seas, a lighthouse, and a wrecked ship in the background. A ribbon for engraving an inscription is atop that side. The surfaces are pleasing and lustrous, golden rosy brown without the thick bronzed patina most often seen on late 19th century US Mint medals. Some spare hairlines are seen, to no significant effect, and a couple of subtle areas of deeper toning are present near the rims. The edges and rims are sound and no bad marks are seen. A glass reveals double striking, no great surprise considering the immense relief of the designs, particularly on the reverse.


While Julian notes that 34 specimens were struck as awards for the State Department, these appear to be awarded, engraved pieces. From my reading of the mintage records, it looks like a total of 98 were struck in bronze. Most were struck soon after the dies were put into service in 1860. A batch of 25 struck in the spring of 1875 lasted until 1890, when 5 more examples were coined. A final 8 specimens were struck between 1902 and 1904. Thus, there were probably 64 unawarded specimens, like this one, struck in bronze between 1860 and 1904, in addition to 19 awarded pieces in gold (of which I know of only two) and 10 awarded in silver (I know of just one survivor). While avidly sought by the subset of collectors who specialize in Lifesaving medals, this type deserves more attention from mainstream medal collectors who will appreciate its design, history, and rarity.

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade RAW
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc Not Specified
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 18012

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

Description

Details

(ca. 1860) U.S. State Department Lifesaving medal. Bronze, 67 mm. Julian LS-1. Choice Mint State. Unawarded. Dies by Emanuel Leutze. A very scarce early US Mint-struck lifesaving medals, struck from dies by the man famous for his painting Washington Crossing the Delaware. The obverse depicts one of the most impressive eagle designs in all of American numismatics, while the reverse depicts a sailor rescuing another from a shipwreck, with rough seas, a lighthouse, and a wrecked ship in the background. A ribbon for engraving an inscription is atop that side. The surfaces are pleasing and lustrous, golden rosy brown without the thick bronzed patina most often seen on late 19th century US Mint medals. Some spare hairlines are seen, to no significant effect, and a couple of subtle areas of deeper toning are present near the rims. The edges and rims are sound and no bad marks are seen. A glass reveals double striking, no great surprise considering the immense relief of the designs, particularly on the reverse.


While Julian notes that 34 specimens were struck as awards for the State Department, these appear to be awarded, engraved pieces. From my reading of the mintage records, it looks like a total of 98 were struck in bronze. Most were struck soon after the dies were put into service in 1860. A batch of 25 struck in the spring of 1875 lasted until 1890, when 5 more examples were coined. A final 8 specimens were struck between 1902 and 1904. Thus, there were probably 64 unawarded specimens, like this one, struck in bronze between 1860 and 1904, in addition to 19 awarded pieces in gold (of which I know of only two) and 10 awarded in silver (I know of just one survivor). While avidly sought by the subset of collectors who specialize in Lifesaving medals, this type deserves more attention from mainstream medal collectors who will appreciate its design, history, and rarity.

Additional

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade RAW
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc Not Specified
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 18012

Related Blog Article(s)

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

Post your comment

John Kraljevich Americana