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Historic and Well Traveled Palmetto Regiment Medal

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Historic and Well Traveled Palmetto Regiment Medal

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(1850) South Carolina Palmetto Regiment medal. Silver, 48 mm. Named to John Walsingham, Company D. Extremely Fine. Officially authorized by the state of South Carolina, the Palmetto Regiment medal was struck in Charleston in 1850 as a recognition for South Carolina men who fought in the Mexican-American War. The obverse features a Palmetto tree surrounded by the legends "South Carolina to the Palmetto Regiment" along with the Latin mottoes of the state around the peripheries. The names Dickinson, Butler, and Gladden atop the central obverse refer to the three commanding colonels of the regiment. Butler is depicted on the reverse at the front of a dinghy bound for shore as the regiment landed at Vera Cruz in March 1847.

This medal was awarded to John Walsingham of Company D, whose commanding officer was Captain Preston Brooks, the man who later became notorious as the Congressman who assaulted Sen. Charles Sumner with his cane on the floor of the Senate in May 1856. Company D was raised around Edgefield, South Carolina, not far from Aiken and the Georgia state line. This precise medal made the news in Aiken in 1899, when former South Carolina governor John Gary Evans came through town on September 20. According to the Aiken Standard, the former governor visited Aiken after stopping at the state capital in Columbia where he "left with the Secretary of State a silver medal given by the State to John Walsingham for services in the Mexican War. Mr. Evans had the medal handed to him in Savannah and leaves it in Columbia to be returned to the heirs of John Walsingham." I acquired this medal from a collection assembled in the late 1950s on the other side of the Georgia state line, a cabinet that had remained intact until recent years.

The medal shows some wear from its journey, as well as a variety of minor marks on its deeply toned slate blue and light gold surfaces. A few little rim marks are seen on the reverse, including a dig below 9:00 and dull bumps at 10:00 and 4:00. The eye appeal is excellent, and the color and surfaces are that of a medal that laid untouched for decades. A previous collector, perhaps the one who purchased it in the 1950s, inked a three-digit inventory number on the edge at 6:00 in black india ink, as he did with many of his most prized medals. While 814 silver medals were awarded by the state, only a tiny fraction of that number have survived and many reside in major South Carolina institutions. The enormous John J. Ford Jr. collection of Mexican War medals included three awarded silver specimens as well as two gold medals (of the 68 struck) awarded to officers. This piece does not appear on any previous censuses of this issue.

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade RAW
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc Not Specified
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 30002

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

Description

Details

(1850) South Carolina Palmetto Regiment medal. Silver, 48 mm. Named to John Walsingham, Company D. Extremely Fine. Officially authorized by the state of South Carolina, the Palmetto Regiment medal was struck in Charleston in 1850 as a recognition for South Carolina men who fought in the Mexican-American War. The obverse features a Palmetto tree surrounded by the legends "South Carolina to the Palmetto Regiment" along with the Latin mottoes of the state around the peripheries. The names Dickinson, Butler, and Gladden atop the central obverse refer to the three commanding colonels of the regiment. Butler is depicted on the reverse at the front of a dinghy bound for shore as the regiment landed at Vera Cruz in March 1847.

This medal was awarded to John Walsingham of Company D, whose commanding officer was Captain Preston Brooks, the man who later became notorious as the Congressman who assaulted Sen. Charles Sumner with his cane on the floor of the Senate in May 1856. Company D was raised around Edgefield, South Carolina, not far from Aiken and the Georgia state line. This precise medal made the news in Aiken in 1899, when former South Carolina governor John Gary Evans came through town on September 20. According to the Aiken Standard, the former governor visited Aiken after stopping at the state capital in Columbia where he "left with the Secretary of State a silver medal given by the State to John Walsingham for services in the Mexican War. Mr. Evans had the medal handed to him in Savannah and leaves it in Columbia to be returned to the heirs of John Walsingham." I acquired this medal from a collection assembled in the late 1950s on the other side of the Georgia state line, a cabinet that had remained intact until recent years.

The medal shows some wear from its journey, as well as a variety of minor marks on its deeply toned slate blue and light gold surfaces. A few little rim marks are seen on the reverse, including a dig below 9:00 and dull bumps at 10:00 and 4:00. The eye appeal is excellent, and the color and surfaces are that of a medal that laid untouched for decades. A previous collector, perhaps the one who purchased it in the 1950s, inked a three-digit inventory number on the edge at 6:00 in black india ink, as he did with many of his most prized medals. While 814 silver medals were awarded by the state, only a tiny fraction of that number have survived and many reside in major South Carolina institutions. The enormous John J. Ford Jr. collection of Mexican War medals included three awarded silver specimens as well as two gold medals (of the 68 struck) awarded to officers. This piece does not appear on any previous censuses of this issue.

Additional

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade RAW
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc Not Specified
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 30002

Related Blog Article(s)

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

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