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Famed 1863 Ulysses S. Grant Medal for Vicksburg

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Famed 1863 Ulysses S. Grant Medal for Vicksburg

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Details

1863 Major General Ulysses S. Grant at Vicksburg medal. Bronze, 103 mm. Julian MI-29. About Uncirculated. Perhaps the most iconic of the Civil War medals, voted by Congress in December 1863, just months after Grant completed his Vicksburg Campaign, allowing the Union to refocus their efforts in the east. Vicksburg fell on July 4, 1863, the day after Lee was turned away at Gettysburg. A little over a year after its authorization, Grant finally had his physical prize: a gold medal that weighed nearly 29 ounces, issued in a custom cask topped by a gold-plated eagle. Grant's example is still in the Smithsonian, often displayed and singularly impressive. Just 126 examples were struck in bronze for collectors (though copy dies have been employed to create the much-maligned "peanut bronze" specimens in the 20th century). These 19th century bronze strikings were popular immediately: 47 were struck in 1865, followed by 5 more in 1871, 1 in 1872, 5 in 1873, 10 in 1874, 5 in 1876, and a further trickle year by year as the Civil War faded into memory. Today, they are not frequently offered, and gems are the exception rather than the rule. This one shows some light cabinet friction on the high points, to be expected of a medal this substantial. Scattered light marks are seen, along with a single dull rim bruise on the obverse near 7:00, but no heavy dents or disfigurements. An ink number on edge at 6:00 links this with the collection within which it resided ca. 1950; the silver Washington Before Boston medal sold for $282,000 bore the same ink in the same spot from the same collection. The surfaces are reflective light brown, a lighter shade than the oft-encountered deep mahogany. The reverse device of Commerce pouring plenty upon Vicksburg and Chattanooga, while surrounded by the Mississippi River (and four side-wheel steamships), is well detaied and highly attractive. Offered far less often than most medals in the US Mint military medal series, this is a standout among the many popular entries in this collecting specialty.

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade RAW
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc Not Specified
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 17102

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

Description

Details

1863 Major General Ulysses S. Grant at Vicksburg medal. Bronze, 103 mm. Julian MI-29. About Uncirculated. Perhaps the most iconic of the Civil War medals, voted by Congress in December 1863, just months after Grant completed his Vicksburg Campaign, allowing the Union to refocus their efforts in the east. Vicksburg fell on July 4, 1863, the day after Lee was turned away at Gettysburg. A little over a year after its authorization, Grant finally had his physical prize: a gold medal that weighed nearly 29 ounces, issued in a custom cask topped by a gold-plated eagle. Grant's example is still in the Smithsonian, often displayed and singularly impressive. Just 126 examples were struck in bronze for collectors (though copy dies have been employed to create the much-maligned "peanut bronze" specimens in the 20th century). These 19th century bronze strikings were popular immediately: 47 were struck in 1865, followed by 5 more in 1871, 1 in 1872, 5 in 1873, 10 in 1874, 5 in 1876, and a further trickle year by year as the Civil War faded into memory. Today, they are not frequently offered, and gems are the exception rather than the rule. This one shows some light cabinet friction on the high points, to be expected of a medal this substantial. Scattered light marks are seen, along with a single dull rim bruise on the obverse near 7:00, but no heavy dents or disfigurements. An ink number on edge at 6:00 links this with the collection within which it resided ca. 1950; the silver Washington Before Boston medal sold for $282,000 bore the same ink in the same spot from the same collection. The surfaces are reflective light brown, a lighter shade than the oft-encountered deep mahogany. The reverse device of Commerce pouring plenty upon Vicksburg and Chattanooga, while surrounded by the Mississippi River (and four side-wheel steamships), is well detaied and highly attractive. Offered far less often than most medals in the US Mint military medal series, this is a standout among the many popular entries in this collecting specialty.

Additional

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade RAW
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc Not Specified
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 17102

Related Blog Article(s)

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

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