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Very Rare Revolutionary War Era George III Indian Peace Medal

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Very Rare Revolutionary War Era George III Indian Peace Medal

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Details

(ca. 1776-1800) George III Indian Peace medal. Medium Size. Silver, 60.5 mm. Adams 8.1, Jamieson 15, Betts-unlisted. First reverse. Extremely Fine. With later replacement hanger. An extremely rare English medal distributed to North American native allies during and after the American Revolution. Though large size undated George III Indian Peace medals, distributed for nearly four decades (1776 to 1814), are actually fairly common, the similar medium sized medals are great rarities, with fewer than 20 accounted for in both public and private hands. These medium sized medals were struck from two reverses, the first (seen here) cracked fairly early in its life, while the second replacement die depicted a post-1801 rendering of the Royal Arms and was used on medals thought to have been mostly distributed during the feverish competition for native allies during the War of 1812. This medal was distributed during the American Revolution and just after, sometime between the summer of 1776 and the era of Fallen Timbers and the Treaty of Greenville. It survived its time in native hands well, with light wear visible on both sides. The original hanger is no longer present, replaced by a later hanger of similar shape marked STERLING. The surfaces are toned antique gray with hints of blue and pale green, glossy and still somewhat lustrous, even a bit reflective on the reverse. The rims, as usual, show a few little nicks and very faint bruises, none serious. A couple of diagonal scratches are noted in front of the profile, another runs from the back of George's head to the hanger, only light hairlines and minor marks and scratches elsewhere. Attractive in hand but clearly worn, this rides that fine balance between an Indian Peace medal that is too worn or disfigured to be pretty and a medal that is not worn enough to be a believable, evocative relic.

Adams listed 16 examples on his "Modern Census," of which seven are from institutional collections.This is presumably number 8 on his list ("Canadian Collection. VF, hanger. First reverse with die break."), though he appears to have conflated it with his number 9 ("London Collection. EF. Second reverse. Old collection number painted on rim.") Though the Adams census, using information supplied by Ford, lists five specimens in the Ford (i.e. "Western Collection"), only four (numbers 13 through 16) were in the Ford sales, one of which (number 13) was a later cast copy that was included in the Ford XVI sale "in deference." Removing Adams 12 (which appears to have been Ford's error) and Adams 13 (which isn't real), assuming the other listings are accuate that leaves just seven in private hands, only three of which were struck from this earlier pre-1801 reverse: this example, Ford XVI:54, and Ford XVI:55. That would place this medal as second finest of just three known examples from these dies. Interestingly, the superb Adams collection lacked a specimen from these dies, though it did include an example from the post-1801 reverse that brought $17,250 in the nadir of the recession (January 12, 2009), a more worn example that lacked its mount but was otherwise quite pleasing. 

Though dozens of times rarer than the large size George III Indian Peace medals (so rare that C. Wyllys Betts had not only never seen one, but neither had any of the authors whose work he consulted), this medium sized medal does not bring a substantial premium -- in fact, a large size medal of this quality would bring just about the same price, maybe even a touch more. The Lion and Wolf medal, which shares an obverse and an era with this medal, is admittedly more distinctive, but it is also significantly more common. A Lion and Wolf medal this nice would bring easily twice as much, or more. Despite the 2006 Ford XVI containing an alarming, never-before-never-since-and-never-again 21 undated George III Indian Peace medals (mostly large size), George III medals are not often seen in the marketplace in any size, grade, or quality. This piece was long ensconced in the collection of Canadian specialist Robert D.W. Band, who was most active in the 1970s and 1980s. Earlier, it was in the collection of an advanced Georgia collector whose estate retained the bulk of his collection from his death in 1991 until I acquired it in 2013 -- acquired everything, that is, but his Lifesaving medals and Indian Peace medals which had been sold years earlier. I had images of his Indian Peace medals, and I also knew that many of his better medals came from a collection Fred Baldwin, of Baldwin's in London, had broken up about 1955. The medals pedigreed to the collection that Baldwin dispersed almost always had an inked inventory mark on the edge, sometimes accompanied by an attribution number, except for medals so thin that edge-inking wasn't permissible, in which case the inking was done on the reverse. The silver Washington Before Boston medal that brought nearly $300,000 in 2014 had the same ink and was from the same English collection, though it never made it into the Georgia collection. I still have some medals that bear the same ink. This medal shows the inventory number (3602) and the Jamieson attribution number (J-15), inobtrusively providing a link to an unidentified but impressive collection of English, Canadian, and American medals that was broken up more than a half century ago.

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade RAW
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc Not Specified
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 400001

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

Description

Details

(ca. 1776-1800) George III Indian Peace medal. Medium Size. Silver, 60.5 mm. Adams 8.1, Jamieson 15, Betts-unlisted. First reverse. Extremely Fine. With later replacement hanger. An extremely rare English medal distributed to North American native allies during and after the American Revolution. Though large size undated George III Indian Peace medals, distributed for nearly four decades (1776 to 1814), are actually fairly common, the similar medium sized medals are great rarities, with fewer than 20 accounted for in both public and private hands. These medium sized medals were struck from two reverses, the first (seen here) cracked fairly early in its life, while the second replacement die depicted a post-1801 rendering of the Royal Arms and was used on medals thought to have been mostly distributed during the feverish competition for native allies during the War of 1812. This medal was distributed during the American Revolution and just after, sometime between the summer of 1776 and the era of Fallen Timbers and the Treaty of Greenville. It survived its time in native hands well, with light wear visible on both sides. The original hanger is no longer present, replaced by a later hanger of similar shape marked STERLING. The surfaces are toned antique gray with hints of blue and pale green, glossy and still somewhat lustrous, even a bit reflective on the reverse. The rims, as usual, show a few little nicks and very faint bruises, none serious. A couple of diagonal scratches are noted in front of the profile, another runs from the back of George's head to the hanger, only light hairlines and minor marks and scratches elsewhere. Attractive in hand but clearly worn, this rides that fine balance between an Indian Peace medal that is too worn or disfigured to be pretty and a medal that is not worn enough to be a believable, evocative relic.

Adams listed 16 examples on his "Modern Census," of which seven are from institutional collections.This is presumably number 8 on his list ("Canadian Collection. VF, hanger. First reverse with die break."), though he appears to have conflated it with his number 9 ("London Collection. EF. Second reverse. Old collection number painted on rim.") Though the Adams census, using information supplied by Ford, lists five specimens in the Ford (i.e. "Western Collection"), only four (numbers 13 through 16) were in the Ford sales, one of which (number 13) was a later cast copy that was included in the Ford XVI sale "in deference." Removing Adams 12 (which appears to have been Ford's error) and Adams 13 (which isn't real), assuming the other listings are accuate that leaves just seven in private hands, only three of which were struck from this earlier pre-1801 reverse: this example, Ford XVI:54, and Ford XVI:55. That would place this medal as second finest of just three known examples from these dies. Interestingly, the superb Adams collection lacked a specimen from these dies, though it did include an example from the post-1801 reverse that brought $17,250 in the nadir of the recession (January 12, 2009), a more worn example that lacked its mount but was otherwise quite pleasing. 

Though dozens of times rarer than the large size George III Indian Peace medals (so rare that C. Wyllys Betts had not only never seen one, but neither had any of the authors whose work he consulted), this medium sized medal does not bring a substantial premium -- in fact, a large size medal of this quality would bring just about the same price, maybe even a touch more. The Lion and Wolf medal, which shares an obverse and an era with this medal, is admittedly more distinctive, but it is also significantly more common. A Lion and Wolf medal this nice would bring easily twice as much, or more. Despite the 2006 Ford XVI containing an alarming, never-before-never-since-and-never-again 21 undated George III Indian Peace medals (mostly large size), George III medals are not often seen in the marketplace in any size, grade, or quality. This piece was long ensconced in the collection of Canadian specialist Robert D.W. Band, who was most active in the 1970s and 1980s. Earlier, it was in the collection of an advanced Georgia collector whose estate retained the bulk of his collection from his death in 1991 until I acquired it in 2013 -- acquired everything, that is, but his Lifesaving medals and Indian Peace medals which had been sold years earlier. I had images of his Indian Peace medals, and I also knew that many of his better medals came from a collection Fred Baldwin, of Baldwin's in London, had broken up about 1955. The medals pedigreed to the collection that Baldwin dispersed almost always had an inked inventory mark on the edge, sometimes accompanied by an attribution number, except for medals so thin that edge-inking wasn't permissible, in which case the inking was done on the reverse. The silver Washington Before Boston medal that brought nearly $300,000 in 2014 had the same ink and was from the same English collection, though it never made it into the Georgia collection. I still have some medals that bear the same ink. This medal shows the inventory number (3602) and the Jamieson attribution number (J-15), inobtrusively providing a link to an unidentified but impressive collection of English, Canadian, and American medals that was broken up more than a half century ago.

Additional

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade RAW
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc Not Specified
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 400001

Related Blog Article(s)

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

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