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Counterstamped 1825 Bust Half, Published by Gould in 1962

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Counterstamped 1825 Bust Half, Published by Gould in 1962

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Details

F. E. CHILDS Jr / 16 CHAPMAN PL on 1825 O-114 Bust half dollar. Brunk C-420, Rulau MV-43. Choice Very Fine. Attractively toned in deep olive gray and gold, with some residual hints of lustre around design elements. Nicely marked in the obverse field by a man who has been found to be a Boston locksmith in the 1870s and 1880s. His location on tiny Chapman Place was right across the street from Boston's old City Hall, which apparently placed him in the ideal position to work for the city, including "locksmithing and bell-hanging" work at the city's schools. This mark is clearly a very rare one: Brunk and Rulau knew only of this piece, though a well worn 1875 quarter with these identical marks was recently discovered on eBay. Brunk and Rulau apparently never saw it, relying on its appearance in the 1962 monograph Merchant Counterstamps on American Silver Coins by Maurice Gould and repeating his error (E.E. Childs instead of F.E. Childs, though it admittedly looks like E.E. on the coin). The Gould monograph was drawn largely, though not exclusively, from coins in his own collection. Gould was a partner in the Copley Coin Company in Boston, and he probably acquired this coin in the Boston area during his decades of collecting. More recently, this piece was in the Steve Tanenbaum collection. Its condition and eye appeal is notable, particularly insofar as this coin was apparently still circulating in Boston 50 years after its mintage! Bust halves made up a substantial portion of bank silver reserves throughout the 19th century (thus why so many survive in high grade), so this may not have been particularly unusual at the time.

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade RAW
Designation N/A
Mint Location No
Strike Type No
Circulated/Uncirc No
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 12029

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

Description

Details

F. E. CHILDS Jr / 16 CHAPMAN PL on 1825 O-114 Bust half dollar. Brunk C-420, Rulau MV-43. Choice Very Fine. Attractively toned in deep olive gray and gold, with some residual hints of lustre around design elements. Nicely marked in the obverse field by a man who has been found to be a Boston locksmith in the 1870s and 1880s. His location on tiny Chapman Place was right across the street from Boston's old City Hall, which apparently placed him in the ideal position to work for the city, including "locksmithing and bell-hanging" work at the city's schools. This mark is clearly a very rare one: Brunk and Rulau knew only of this piece, though a well worn 1875 quarter with these identical marks was recently discovered on eBay. Brunk and Rulau apparently never saw it, relying on its appearance in the 1962 monograph Merchant Counterstamps on American Silver Coins by Maurice Gould and repeating his error (E.E. Childs instead of F.E. Childs, though it admittedly looks like E.E. on the coin). The Gould monograph was drawn largely, though not exclusively, from coins in his own collection. Gould was a partner in the Copley Coin Company in Boston, and he probably acquired this coin in the Boston area during his decades of collecting. More recently, this piece was in the Steve Tanenbaum collection. Its condition and eye appeal is notable, particularly insofar as this coin was apparently still circulating in Boston 50 years after its mintage! Bust halves made up a substantial portion of bank silver reserves throughout the 19th century (thus why so many survive in high grade), so this may not have been particularly unusual at the time.

Additional

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade RAW
Designation N/A
Mint Location No
Strike Type No
Circulated/Uncirc No
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 12029

Related Blog Article(s)

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

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