ARCHIVE

Extremely Rare White Metal Winfield Scott War of 1812 Medal

No one pays more!

For high quality Washington medals. If you have rare or top condition Washington-
iana for sale or trade, contact us!

Extremely Rare White Metal Winfield Scott War of 1812 Medal

SOLD

Details

1814 Major General Winfield Scott medal. White metal, 65 mm. Julian MI-20. Mint State. Dies by Moritz Furst. An extremely rare white metal (tin) striking of this War of 1812 Congressional medal, struck contemporaneously with the gold medal awarded to Scott (i.e. circa 1824). Any War of 1812 medal in white metal is very rare, though no records have survived of just how many were struck. Given their die states (the earliest) and their rarity (extreme), it appears these pieces were coined to give to the awardee of the gold medal to pass out to friends and colleagues. Of those traced, none seem to have surviving populations higher than five or six. I can confirm only two other specimens of this medal in white medal: a beautiful example in the ANS and a fully oxidized piece that surfaced in the marketplace within the last few years. While the magnificent Ford Collection included several War of 1812 medals in white metal, he did not own one of these. The ones he did own (Jacob Brown, Andrew Jackson, Alexander Macomb, and Peter Porter) brought between $3220 and $4312 in January 2005, before the rarity and historicity of these white metal strikes was as appreciated as they are today. The 1986 Dreyfuss sale included just a Porter and an off-quality Isaac Shelby in white metal, while the classic 1981 Kessler-Spangenberger sale by NASCA included white metal examples of Brown, Macomb, Porter, and Shelby, but likewise no Scott. Even back then, when nice bronze War of 1812 medals could be had for under $50, the white metal Shelby brought $775 hammer -- and Shelby is perhaps the most common of these in white metal. The surfaces of this piece are prooflike and beautiful, with a glass picking up just some very minor hairlines and a hint of toning in the right obverse field. The rims and edges are perfect and no major flaws are present. The die states are, as expected, the earliest. For advanced specialists, this may be a once in a lifetime opportunity. This piece was purchased from Fred Baldwin of Baldwin's in London in the late 1950s as part of a naval medal collection assembled by Milford-Haven numbers; it has remained in that collection until I acquired it.  

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade RAW
Designation N/A
Mint Location No
Strike Type No
Circulated/Uncirc No
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 11032

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

Description

Details

1814 Major General Winfield Scott medal. White metal, 65 mm. Julian MI-20. Mint State. Dies by Moritz Furst. An extremely rare white metal (tin) striking of this War of 1812 Congressional medal, struck contemporaneously with the gold medal awarded to Scott (i.e. circa 1824). Any War of 1812 medal in white metal is very rare, though no records have survived of just how many were struck. Given their die states (the earliest) and their rarity (extreme), it appears these pieces were coined to give to the awardee of the gold medal to pass out to friends and colleagues. Of those traced, none seem to have surviving populations higher than five or six. I can confirm only two other specimens of this medal in white medal: a beautiful example in the ANS and a fully oxidized piece that surfaced in the marketplace within the last few years. While the magnificent Ford Collection included several War of 1812 medals in white metal, he did not own one of these. The ones he did own (Jacob Brown, Andrew Jackson, Alexander Macomb, and Peter Porter) brought between $3220 and $4312 in January 2005, before the rarity and historicity of these white metal strikes was as appreciated as they are today. The 1986 Dreyfuss sale included just a Porter and an off-quality Isaac Shelby in white metal, while the classic 1981 Kessler-Spangenberger sale by NASCA included white metal examples of Brown, Macomb, Porter, and Shelby, but likewise no Scott. Even back then, when nice bronze War of 1812 medals could be had for under $50, the white metal Shelby brought $775 hammer -- and Shelby is perhaps the most common of these in white metal. The surfaces of this piece are prooflike and beautiful, with a glass picking up just some very minor hairlines and a hint of toning in the right obverse field. The rims and edges are perfect and no major flaws are present. The die states are, as expected, the earliest. For advanced specialists, this may be a once in a lifetime opportunity. This piece was purchased from Fred Baldwin of Baldwin's in London in the late 1950s as part of a naval medal collection assembled by Milford-Haven numbers; it has remained in that collection until I acquired it.  

Additional

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade RAW
Designation N/A
Mint Location No
Strike Type No
Circulated/Uncirc No
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 11032

Related Blog Article(s)

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

Post your comment

John Kraljevich Americana