ARCHIVE

Showing Off Janvier's Legendary Reducing Lathe, En Medaille

No one pays more!

For high quality Washington medals. If you have rare or top condition Washington-
iana for sale or trade, contact us!

Showing Off Janvier's Legendary Reducing Lathe, En Medaille

SOLD

Details

(ca. 1900) Duval Janvier medal by Alexandre-Louis-Marie Charpentier. Bronze, 52 x 60 mm. Jones (The Art of the Medal) 345. About Uncirculated. Edge marked with a tiny triangle privy mark and BRONZE. Nice light golden brown antiqued patina with lightly gloss but chiefly mattelike surfaces. Light handling is noted under scrutiny, a few wispy hairlines but nothing serious, one rim bruise at the upper of two corners at the southeast corner of the reverse. A popular and attractive art medal, important to students of minting technology for two reasons: the fine Art Nouveau depiction of a minter swinging a screw press on the obverse, and rendering of the fruits of the Janvier reducing lathe on the reverse, with three successively smaller renditions of the obverse shown from lower right to upper left. The term "Janvier lathe" is thrown around a lot by those who study minting technology. It was introduced to the U.S. Mint in 1907, though it was commonplace in European mints earlier. It enabled sculptors to design large models, then have them accurately reduced to the size of a coining die without surrending immense amounts of detail, streamlinining the processes of hub and die production as well as making for a more artistic final product. As noted in Taxay's U.S. Mint and Coinage, page 314, "Saint-Gaudens had written to Director Roberts that he had 'made the relief of the One Cent high, knowing from what Mr. Hering tells me that you have a Janvier Machine and can reduce it to the relief you wish.' Taxay continued "The Janvier lathe had just been purchased at the instance [sic, insistence] of President Roosevelt. It seems that Hering had complained to Barber of the poor quality reductions made by the Mint's forty-year old Hill machine, and receiving no satisfaction, took up the matter with Saint-Gaudens. The latter informed Roosevelt with the result that a Janvier lathe was immediately installed." That's the short version. The long version (and thus, as usual, the more correct one) is featured in Roger Burdette's excellent Renaissance of American Coinage, 1905-1908, where the term "Janvier" turns up in the index no less than 25 times. By comparison, chief engraver Charles Barber turns up 19. Sounds like this Janvier contraption must have been pretty important! This medal advertised the Janvier and Duval's firm services in reducing and striking medals, services Saint-Gaudens availed himself of in 1906 in the lead up to the production of his eagle and double eagle. As usual, Burdette tells the story in superb, complete fashion, and we refer those interested in more to his book.

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade N/A
Designation N/A
Mint Location No
Strike Type No
Circulated/Uncirc No
Grade Add On No
SKU or Cert # 00000108

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

Description

Details

(ca. 1900) Duval Janvier medal by Alexandre-Louis-Marie Charpentier. Bronze, 52 x 60 mm. Jones (The Art of the Medal) 345. About Uncirculated. Edge marked with a tiny triangle privy mark and BRONZE. Nice light golden brown antiqued patina with lightly gloss but chiefly mattelike surfaces. Light handling is noted under scrutiny, a few wispy hairlines but nothing serious, one rim bruise at the upper of two corners at the southeast corner of the reverse. A popular and attractive art medal, important to students of minting technology for two reasons: the fine Art Nouveau depiction of a minter swinging a screw press on the obverse, and rendering of the fruits of the Janvier reducing lathe on the reverse, with three successively smaller renditions of the obverse shown from lower right to upper left. The term "Janvier lathe" is thrown around a lot by those who study minting technology. It was introduced to the U.S. Mint in 1907, though it was commonplace in European mints earlier. It enabled sculptors to design large models, then have them accurately reduced to the size of a coining die without surrending immense amounts of detail, streamlinining the processes of hub and die production as well as making for a more artistic final product. As noted in Taxay's U.S. Mint and Coinage, page 314, "Saint-Gaudens had written to Director Roberts that he had 'made the relief of the One Cent high, knowing from what Mr. Hering tells me that you have a Janvier Machine and can reduce it to the relief you wish.' Taxay continued "The Janvier lathe had just been purchased at the instance [sic, insistence] of President Roosevelt. It seems that Hering had complained to Barber of the poor quality reductions made by the Mint's forty-year old Hill machine, and receiving no satisfaction, took up the matter with Saint-Gaudens. The latter informed Roosevelt with the result that a Janvier lathe was immediately installed." That's the short version. The long version (and thus, as usual, the more correct one) is featured in Roger Burdette's excellent Renaissance of American Coinage, 1905-1908, where the term "Janvier" turns up in the index no less than 25 times. By comparison, chief engraver Charles Barber turns up 19. Sounds like this Janvier contraption must have been pretty important! This medal advertised the Janvier and Duval's firm services in reducing and striking medals, services Saint-Gaudens availed himself of in 1906 in the lead up to the production of his eagle and double eagle. As usual, Burdette tells the story in superb, complete fashion, and we refer those interested in more to his book.

Additional

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade N/A
Designation N/A
Mint Location No
Strike Type No
Circulated/Uncirc No
Grade Add On No
SKU or Cert # 00000108

Related Blog Article(s)

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

Post your comment

John Kraljevich Americana