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Highly Elusive Julian AM-71, Agricultural Society of Philadelphia Second Premium Medal

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Highly Elusive Julian AM-71, Agricultural Society of Philadelphia Second Premium Medal

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Details

(ca. 1822?) Agricultural Society of Philadelphia Second Premium medal. Bronze, 51 mm. Julian AM-71. About Uncirculated or better. Called Rarity-8 in Joe Levine's sale 77, which included the best cataloguing effort this very rare medal has ever seen. Joe noted that in his extensive database, which goes back to the day after Moses descended from Sinai, he located just two previous auction appearances of this medal: a spotted AU (almost certainly this piece) in his 1983 Auction 34 and a corroded EF/AU in his 2005 Auction 74, making for just three confirmed bronze sightings from these dies. The related Julian AM-73 is first known dated 1823; the society first held fairs in 1822, so these dies probably date from about this era, making them one of the earliest entries in the US Agricultural medal series. In 1860, James Ross Snowden noted that the first prize (with a different reverse die, Julian AM-73) had been engraved by "Schormann," seemingly a reference to Ernest Chormann, who flourished during the 1850s. In 1862, Alfred Satterlee catalogued a specimen from these dies in one of his collection sales. The Agricultural Society of Philadelphia, also known as the Philadelphia Society for Promoting Agriculture, issued gold medals as early as 1785. Those earliest medals, engraved rather than die struck, are not known to have survived. I know of just one awarded silver medal, struck from the first prize reverse die and dated 1855, in the collection of Alan V. Weinberg. As a very early US Mint medal, this rarity is sorely underappreciated -- it is one of those things that would be better known and more desirable if the population increased tenfold. The surfaces are highly reflective, pleasantly toned medium brown, likely coined before the late 1830s and Franklin Peale's experiments with bronzing. The large upper obverse field shows a significant scattering of light marks, and a spot is noted at PH(IA) of PHILADELPHIA. The reverse also shows scattered marks, minor hairlines, and a line of spotting across the center of the unengraved field. The eye appeal remains nice, and its tough to be too picky about condition with a medal this rare. The sharpness is excellent, nicely showcasing the charming design. A prize for early American agricultural medal enthusiasts.

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade RAW
Designation N/A
Mint Location Philadelphia
Strike Type Business
Circulated/Uncirc Uncirculated
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 14007

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

Description

Details

(ca. 1822?) Agricultural Society of Philadelphia Second Premium medal. Bronze, 51 mm. Julian AM-71. About Uncirculated or better. Called Rarity-8 in Joe Levine's sale 77, which included the best cataloguing effort this very rare medal has ever seen. Joe noted that in his extensive database, which goes back to the day after Moses descended from Sinai, he located just two previous auction appearances of this medal: a spotted AU (almost certainly this piece) in his 1983 Auction 34 and a corroded EF/AU in his 2005 Auction 74, making for just three confirmed bronze sightings from these dies. The related Julian AM-73 is first known dated 1823; the society first held fairs in 1822, so these dies probably date from about this era, making them one of the earliest entries in the US Agricultural medal series. In 1860, James Ross Snowden noted that the first prize (with a different reverse die, Julian AM-73) had been engraved by "Schormann," seemingly a reference to Ernest Chormann, who flourished during the 1850s. In 1862, Alfred Satterlee catalogued a specimen from these dies in one of his collection sales. The Agricultural Society of Philadelphia, also known as the Philadelphia Society for Promoting Agriculture, issued gold medals as early as 1785. Those earliest medals, engraved rather than die struck, are not known to have survived. I know of just one awarded silver medal, struck from the first prize reverse die and dated 1855, in the collection of Alan V. Weinberg. As a very early US Mint medal, this rarity is sorely underappreciated -- it is one of those things that would be better known and more desirable if the population increased tenfold. The surfaces are highly reflective, pleasantly toned medium brown, likely coined before the late 1830s and Franklin Peale's experiments with bronzing. The large upper obverse field shows a significant scattering of light marks, and a spot is noted at PH(IA) of PHILADELPHIA. The reverse also shows scattered marks, minor hairlines, and a line of spotting across the center of the unengraved field. The eye appeal remains nice, and its tough to be too picky about condition with a medal this rare. The sharpness is excellent, nicely showcasing the charming design. A prize for early American agricultural medal enthusiasts.

Additional

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade RAW
Designation N/A
Mint Location Philadelphia
Strike Type Business
Circulated/Uncirc Uncirculated
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 14007

Related Blog Article(s)

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

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