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1911 Edward Knox Elder Medal for Osage Chief Wah-She-Ha or "Bacon Rind." Brass, 38 mm. Mint State.

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1911 Edward Knox Elder Medal for Osage Chief Wah-She-Ha or "Bacon Rind." Brass, 38 mm. Mint State.

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Details

1911 Edward Knox Elder Medal for Osage Chief Wah-She-Ha or "Bacon Rind." Brass, 38 mm. Mint State. Holed for suspension. Plain edge. Untoned bright golden brass with strong field reflectivity and bright original lustre. Some light scattered hairlines and surface marks are trivial both individually and as a group. This rare medal is one of the more modern entries in the American Indian Peace medal series, struck privately by Osage trader Edward Knox Elder, who was identified in The Numismatist  in 1911 as coin dealer Thomas Elder's brother. Thomas Elder struck a number of dollar-sized medals in this era, many of which are popularly collected as so-called dollars; this one, were it more common, likely would be collected along side of them. Bacon Rind was something of a Native American celebrity, frequently photographed both on and off the Oklahoma Osage reservation. The photograph that appears to be the mother image for his portrait on this medal depicts him wearing a Zachary Taylor Indian Peace medal, though he is also seen wearing (in his younger days) a James Buchanan Indian Peace medal and even (in 1916) a post-1903 U.S. Mint George Washington Indian Peace medal, a medal struck not for native presentation but for collectors -- perhaps E.K. Elder acquired it from his brother. According to mintages released in 1911, just 25 specimens of this medal were struck in brass, along with a similar number in German silver, 15 in copper, 5 in silver, and allegedly 400 in aluminum, though alumiunum examples are not anywhere near that common today. Most surviving examples show light handling, suggesting that many actually were distributed for adornment to members of the Osage tribe rather than sold directly to collectors. Silver pieces have brought as much as $18,400 at auction, though they tend to bring in the $5-6000 range. No brass example was included in the enormous John J. Ford Jr. collection of Indian Peace medals, though he did own a single silver specimen. 

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade N/A
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc N/A
Grade Add On No
SKU or Cert # 9076

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Description

Details

1911 Edward Knox Elder Medal for Osage Chief Wah-She-Ha or "Bacon Rind." Brass, 38 mm. Mint State. Holed for suspension. Plain edge. Untoned bright golden brass with strong field reflectivity and bright original lustre. Some light scattered hairlines and surface marks are trivial both individually and as a group. This rare medal is one of the more modern entries in the American Indian Peace medal series, struck privately by Osage trader Edward Knox Elder, who was identified in The Numismatist  in 1911 as coin dealer Thomas Elder's brother. Thomas Elder struck a number of dollar-sized medals in this era, many of which are popularly collected as so-called dollars; this one, were it more common, likely would be collected along side of them. Bacon Rind was something of a Native American celebrity, frequently photographed both on and off the Oklahoma Osage reservation. The photograph that appears to be the mother image for his portrait on this medal depicts him wearing a Zachary Taylor Indian Peace medal, though he is also seen wearing (in his younger days) a James Buchanan Indian Peace medal and even (in 1916) a post-1903 U.S. Mint George Washington Indian Peace medal, a medal struck not for native presentation but for collectors -- perhaps E.K. Elder acquired it from his brother. According to mintages released in 1911, just 25 specimens of this medal were struck in brass, along with a similar number in German silver, 15 in copper, 5 in silver, and allegedly 400 in aluminum, though alumiunum examples are not anywhere near that common today. Most surviving examples show light handling, suggesting that many actually were distributed for adornment to members of the Osage tribe rather than sold directly to collectors. Silver pieces have brought as much as $18,400 at auction, though they tend to bring in the $5-6000 range. No brass example was included in the enormous John J. Ford Jr. collection of Indian Peace medals, though he did own a single silver specimen. 

Additional

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade N/A
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc N/A
Grade Add On No
SKU or Cert # 9076

Related Blog Article(s)

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

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