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1871 Abraham Lincoln / Emancipation Proclamation medal. Bronze, 45 mm. Julian CM-16. Dies by William Barber. Mint State.

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1871 Abraham Lincoln / Emancipation Proclamation medal. Bronze, 45 mm. Julian CM-16. Dies by William Barber. Mint State.

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Details

1871 Abraham Lincoln / Emancipation Proclamation medal. Bronze, 45 mm. Julian CM-16. Dies by William Barber. Mint State. A very attractive specimen, with bold reflectivity on both sides instead of the heavy bronzing typically seen on this issue. The surfaces are light mahogany with plenty of underlying gold and pale blue, lustrous and eye-catching. The high profile portrait of Lincoln has the merest whisper of cabinet friction on a single strand of hair, far less than usually encountered. A few little marks are seen, including a couple of hairline scratches in the right obverse field and two tiny rim ticks over COLN of LINCOLN. The eye appeal is superb. For whatever reason, choice examples of this medal are tougher to find than most medals struck in this era. There were 363 pieces struck in bronze between 1871 (when the first 45 pieces were struck) and 1904. The biggest single mintage year was 1872, with 155; after that, most years were 5, 10, or none at all, as demand required. It is no great surprise that Mint Director James Pollock, whose name appears at the base of the reverse, thought to honor Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation -- he got to know Lincoln well when they were both Congressmen and both roomed at Mrs. Anne Spriggs' boardinghouse, where Pollock's better-refined anti-slavery ideas may have informed Lincoln's evolving opinion on the issue. After Pollock chose not to run again for Governor of Pennsylvania, Lincoln appointed him to be Director of the Mint. This medal is something of a thank you card to one of our most beloved Presidents.

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade N/A
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc N/A
Grade Add On No
SKU or Cert # 10013016

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Description

Details

1871 Abraham Lincoln / Emancipation Proclamation medal. Bronze, 45 mm. Julian CM-16. Dies by William Barber. Mint State. A very attractive specimen, with bold reflectivity on both sides instead of the heavy bronzing typically seen on this issue. The surfaces are light mahogany with plenty of underlying gold and pale blue, lustrous and eye-catching. The high profile portrait of Lincoln has the merest whisper of cabinet friction on a single strand of hair, far less than usually encountered. A few little marks are seen, including a couple of hairline scratches in the right obverse field and two tiny rim ticks over COLN of LINCOLN. The eye appeal is superb. For whatever reason, choice examples of this medal are tougher to find than most medals struck in this era. There were 363 pieces struck in bronze between 1871 (when the first 45 pieces were struck) and 1904. The biggest single mintage year was 1872, with 155; after that, most years were 5, 10, or none at all, as demand required. It is no great surprise that Mint Director James Pollock, whose name appears at the base of the reverse, thought to honor Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation -- he got to know Lincoln well when they were both Congressmen and both roomed at Mrs. Anne Spriggs' boardinghouse, where Pollock's better-refined anti-slavery ideas may have informed Lincoln's evolving opinion on the issue. After Pollock chose not to run again for Governor of Pennsylvania, Lincoln appointed him to be Director of the Mint. This medal is something of a thank you card to one of our most beloved Presidents.

Additional

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade N/A
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc N/A
Grade Add On No
SKU or Cert # 10013016

Related Blog Article(s)

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

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