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1856 Millard Fillmore campaign medalet. Dewitt MF 1856-1. Copper, 39 mm. MS-63 BN (NGC).

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1856 Millard Fillmore campaign medalet. Dewitt MF 1856-1. Copper, 39 mm. MS-63 BN (NGC).

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From the John J. Ford Jr. Collection.

Details

1856 Millard Fillmore campaign medalet. Dewitt MF 1856-1. Copper, 39 mm. MS-63 BN (NGC). Though called "BN" the surfaces are rich with original mint color, lustrous and bright, only barely faded on the portrait and a bit in the fields. The reverse shows profound double striking, which the high relief obverse portrait would have required. A really beautiful piece, with just a couple of little spots under Fillmore's jawline and no other issues of consequence. Any Fillmore piece is scarce: none were struck for his abortive 1852 campaign and Dewitt records only seven varieties for his third party candidacy in 1856, including one he had never seen. This one, the most interesting and impressive of the Fillmore medalets, is typically seen in white metal, when seen at all. The Littman and Sullivan pieces were both white metal, the latter one holed. Ford owned only one specimen of this variety, the present piece. Satterlee, writing in 1862, stated that the mintage of this variety in copper was just six pieces, which jibes with the currently known tiny population. This obverse, copied from the portrait on Fillmore's Indian Peace medal, is also used on Dewitt MF 1856-2, whose reverse shows the inscription THE UNION enclosed in 33 stars. The engraver was John C. Odling, later the partner of William H. Key, whose shop on Arch Street in Philadelphia was not far from the Second Philadelphia Mint. For those who seek out a medalet from each President, or even each candidate, chances to add Fillmore to your collection are few and far between.

Additional Information

Grading Service NGC
Grade MS63
Designation BN
Mint Location Philadelphia
Strike Type Business
Circulated/Uncirc Uncirculated
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 2604559008

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

Description

Details

1856 Millard Fillmore campaign medalet. Dewitt MF 1856-1. Copper, 39 mm. MS-63 BN (NGC). Though called "BN" the surfaces are rich with original mint color, lustrous and bright, only barely faded on the portrait and a bit in the fields. The reverse shows profound double striking, which the high relief obverse portrait would have required. A really beautiful piece, with just a couple of little spots under Fillmore's jawline and no other issues of consequence. Any Fillmore piece is scarce: none were struck for his abortive 1852 campaign and Dewitt records only seven varieties for his third party candidacy in 1856, including one he had never seen. This one, the most interesting and impressive of the Fillmore medalets, is typically seen in white metal, when seen at all. The Littman and Sullivan pieces were both white metal, the latter one holed. Ford owned only one specimen of this variety, the present piece. Satterlee, writing in 1862, stated that the mintage of this variety in copper was just six pieces, which jibes with the currently known tiny population. This obverse, copied from the portrait on Fillmore's Indian Peace medal, is also used on Dewitt MF 1856-2, whose reverse shows the inscription THE UNION enclosed in 33 stars. The engraver was John C. Odling, later the partner of William H. Key, whose shop on Arch Street in Philadelphia was not far from the Second Philadelphia Mint. For those who seek out a medalet from each President, or even each candidate, chances to add Fillmore to your collection are few and far between.

Additional

Additional Information

Grading Service NGC
Grade MS63
Designation BN
Mint Location Philadelphia
Strike Type Business
Circulated/Uncirc Uncirculated
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 2604559008

Related Blog Article(s)

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

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