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Very Rare Feb 22 1836 First Steam Coinage Medal

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Very Rare Feb 22 1836 First Steam Coinage Medal

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Details

1836 First Steam Coinage medal by Christian Gobrecht. Bronze, 28 mm. Julian MT-20. Choice Very Fine. Plain edge. 164.2 grains. A classic medal marking a significant chapter in US Mint history, the introduction of steam power to the production of our coinage. This very rare variety was struck on large cent planchets in very limited numbers -- apparently just a few handfuls that were coined on February 22, 1836 (George Washington's birthday) before the steam coinage press broke down. Those, like this one, struck using the first state of the reverse die are very rare. A later variety, showing the reverse die modified to read Mar. 23 instead of Feb. 22, was struck in far greater numbers from 1836 through 1862, when an entirely new reverse die was composed. The original steam coinage press languished in the basement of the Franklin Institutee for decades (they long used it to strike those little cent-sized Benjamin Franklin tokens), but it now rests comfortably in the ANA Money Museum in Colorado Springs.

This example is finer than most examples I've encountered. Though most medals of this era were destined for rather immediate placement in numismatic cabinets, most of the February 22 First Steam Coinage medals are well worn. It's possible that they were pocket pieces of mint employees. It's also possible that, being struck on cent planchets, most of them were just spent. I've never seen a Mint State one, and I've only had one finer than this one that I can remember. This example looks like a choice VF large cent, with nice medium brown surfaces, smooth and glossy, and only a couple minor marks. The rims are intact and the surfaces are original. A slightly better one brought $4,600 in StacksBowers' January 2012 Americana sale.

Engraved by Christian Gobrecht, this relic of the moment the US Mint caught up with the Industrial Revolution is avidly sought by collectors of Federal coins, particularly specialists in large cents.

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade N/A
Designation N/A
Mint Location No
Strike Type No
Circulated/Uncirc No
Grade Add On No
SKU or Cert # 7003

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

Description

Details

1836 First Steam Coinage medal by Christian Gobrecht. Bronze, 28 mm. Julian MT-20. Choice Very Fine. Plain edge. 164.2 grains. A classic medal marking a significant chapter in US Mint history, the introduction of steam power to the production of our coinage. This very rare variety was struck on large cent planchets in very limited numbers -- apparently just a few handfuls that were coined on February 22, 1836 (George Washington's birthday) before the steam coinage press broke down. Those, like this one, struck using the first state of the reverse die are very rare. A later variety, showing the reverse die modified to read Mar. 23 instead of Feb. 22, was struck in far greater numbers from 1836 through 1862, when an entirely new reverse die was composed. The original steam coinage press languished in the basement of the Franklin Institutee for decades (they long used it to strike those little cent-sized Benjamin Franklin tokens), but it now rests comfortably in the ANA Money Museum in Colorado Springs.

This example is finer than most examples I've encountered. Though most medals of this era were destined for rather immediate placement in numismatic cabinets, most of the February 22 First Steam Coinage medals are well worn. It's possible that they were pocket pieces of mint employees. It's also possible that, being struck on cent planchets, most of them were just spent. I've never seen a Mint State one, and I've only had one finer than this one that I can remember. This example looks like a choice VF large cent, with nice medium brown surfaces, smooth and glossy, and only a couple minor marks. The rims are intact and the surfaces are original. A slightly better one brought $4,600 in StacksBowers' January 2012 Americana sale.

Engraved by Christian Gobrecht, this relic of the moment the US Mint caught up with the Industrial Revolution is avidly sought by collectors of Federal coins, particularly specialists in large cents.

Additional

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade N/A
Designation N/A
Mint Location No
Strike Type No
Circulated/Uncirc No
Grade Add On No
SKU or Cert # 7003

Related Blog Article(s)

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

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John Kraljevich Americana