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Rare and Historic 1825 Lafayette "Companion of Washington" Medal

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Rare and Historic 1825 Lafayette "Companion of Washington" Medal

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Details

1825 Companion of Washington Medal. Silver, 30 mm. Fuld LA.1825.1, Olivier-unlisted. Fine. From the notable collection of Lafayette medals formed by F.C.C. Boyd (later acquired by John J. Ford Jr.), catalogued by yours truly for auction as "pleasant and evenly worn surfaces show light golden and blue toning to very attractive effect. Scattered light old pin scratches are present in the right obverse field, along with one shallow scrape; a few less severe hairline scratches are present on the obverse. Nice rims, no bad marks, just pocket-piece type wear. The detail remains good, with most of the globe detail still present."

Boyd owned two of these rare medals in silver; the specimen in the Patriot Collection (sold by Stack's in 2010) makes a grand total of three I've seen in silver, in addition to a couple in copper. When the Patriot specimen brought $1,840, I thought it seemed cheap: here is an American-made silver medal of great rarity, connecting Lafayette and George Washington on the occasion of Lafayette's legendary visit (his arrival and departure dates are in the reverse exergue, missing from most advanced collections and depicting not only a fine portrait of Lafayette but a charming map on the reverse. The appearance of two in the Boyd-Ford sale may have made this medal look momentarily common, which it is assuredly not. The unsigned dies have been shown by researcher Chris Neuzil to be the work of Moritz Furst, who also accomplished several medals for the US Mint and created medals of this same size marking Dewitt Clinton (a very similar composition) and the War of 1812 naval heros Lawrence and Decatur. 

There are not a lot of collectors of Lafayette medals, but then again most Lafayette medals were struck in France and only peripherally related to America. This one was struck in the United States for an American audience during Lafayette's visit to the United States. If this had ever been listed in a popularly collected reference (think Betts, Julian, 100 Greatest American Medals and Tokens, Baker, etc.), it would be on all sorts of want lists; alas, the standard references on Lafayette are an article published in 1957 in The Numismatist and a book published in French in 1933, leaving this on the outskirts of the medallic exurbs. I think it's charming and would be a fine addition to an advanced collection.

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade RAW
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type Business
Circulated/Uncirc Uncirculated
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 15008

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

Description

Details

1825 Companion of Washington Medal. Silver, 30 mm. Fuld LA.1825.1, Olivier-unlisted. Fine. From the notable collection of Lafayette medals formed by F.C.C. Boyd (later acquired by John J. Ford Jr.), catalogued by yours truly for auction as "pleasant and evenly worn surfaces show light golden and blue toning to very attractive effect. Scattered light old pin scratches are present in the right obverse field, along with one shallow scrape; a few less severe hairline scratches are present on the obverse. Nice rims, no bad marks, just pocket-piece type wear. The detail remains good, with most of the globe detail still present."

Boyd owned two of these rare medals in silver; the specimen in the Patriot Collection (sold by Stack's in 2010) makes a grand total of three I've seen in silver, in addition to a couple in copper. When the Patriot specimen brought $1,840, I thought it seemed cheap: here is an American-made silver medal of great rarity, connecting Lafayette and George Washington on the occasion of Lafayette's legendary visit (his arrival and departure dates are in the reverse exergue, missing from most advanced collections and depicting not only a fine portrait of Lafayette but a charming map on the reverse. The appearance of two in the Boyd-Ford sale may have made this medal look momentarily common, which it is assuredly not. The unsigned dies have been shown by researcher Chris Neuzil to be the work of Moritz Furst, who also accomplished several medals for the US Mint and created medals of this same size marking Dewitt Clinton (a very similar composition) and the War of 1812 naval heros Lawrence and Decatur. 

There are not a lot of collectors of Lafayette medals, but then again most Lafayette medals were struck in France and only peripherally related to America. This one was struck in the United States for an American audience during Lafayette's visit to the United States. If this had ever been listed in a popularly collected reference (think Betts, Julian, 100 Greatest American Medals and Tokens, Baker, etc.), it would be on all sorts of want lists; alas, the standard references on Lafayette are an article published in 1957 in The Numismatist and a book published in French in 1933, leaving this on the outskirts of the medallic exurbs. I think it's charming and would be a fine addition to an advanced collection.

Additional

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade RAW
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type Business
Circulated/Uncirc Uncirculated
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 15008

Related Blog Article(s)

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

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