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Underrated 1814 Treaty of Ghent Medal Rarity

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Underrated 1814 Treaty of Ghent Medal Rarity

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Details

1814 Treaty of Ghent medal. Silvered white metal, 45 mm. Breton-30, BHM-841. Extremely Fine. Struck on a white metal (pewter) planchet covered in pure tin, referred to as "silvered," a misnomer. A rare little medallic stepchild, one of just two War of 1812 reference medals struck in England (aside from the later General Service military medals with War of 1812 bars). Too late for Betts, struck in the wrong place to be included in Julian and thus receive attention from those who pursue the War of 1812 naval and military medals, this would be a legendary rarity if it was better known (but, alas, most legendary rarities become well known by being more common than this). The surfaces are deeply toned, charcoal gray with lively multicolor highlights, particularly rich and colorful on the reverse. The fields are fully and stably oxidized, giving them a slightly granular appearance, though bright proof like lustre surrounds the design elements. This "pull-away" toning happened when the tin plating was stretched by the force of the deepest relief of the die, exposing the metal beneath at the moment of striking. Some field marks and shallow flakes are seen, but there is little actual wear and the eye appeal is excellent. Intriguingly, though every authority agrees this is the work of John Gregory Hancock (I agree), it is signed "Wyan" at the base of the obverse, perhaps to capitalize upon the famous name of "Wyon," Britain's greatest medallist of the era. 

 

This is a rare medal. There was one in the Ford Collection, a lovely bronze piece bought by a savvy collector in the October 2004 Ford V sale; if Ford had ever been offered a nice white metal one, he would have bought it. There is a pretty nice white metal piece in the Yale collection, though it is just white metal, not silvered white metal. A well worn one brought $500 hammer in an Internet auction nearly a decade ago, and we had a fairly scruffy one come through ANR when I was there almost as long ago. A specimen was in the 1882 Bushnell sale, and the ANS and British Museum both contain specimens, in white metal and bronze, respectively. Laurence Brown, in British Historical Medals, called bronze specimens RR and white metal ones R (as in Rare). This is the first example I've owned in either metal, and it's certainly the prettiest white metal one that's been on the market in quite some time.

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade RAW
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc Not Specified
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 12107

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

Description

Details

1814 Treaty of Ghent medal. Silvered white metal, 45 mm. Breton-30, BHM-841. Extremely Fine. Struck on a white metal (pewter) planchet covered in pure tin, referred to as "silvered," a misnomer. A rare little medallic stepchild, one of just two War of 1812 reference medals struck in England (aside from the later General Service military medals with War of 1812 bars). Too late for Betts, struck in the wrong place to be included in Julian and thus receive attention from those who pursue the War of 1812 naval and military medals, this would be a legendary rarity if it was better known (but, alas, most legendary rarities become well known by being more common than this). The surfaces are deeply toned, charcoal gray with lively multicolor highlights, particularly rich and colorful on the reverse. The fields are fully and stably oxidized, giving them a slightly granular appearance, though bright proof like lustre surrounds the design elements. This "pull-away" toning happened when the tin plating was stretched by the force of the deepest relief of the die, exposing the metal beneath at the moment of striking. Some field marks and shallow flakes are seen, but there is little actual wear and the eye appeal is excellent. Intriguingly, though every authority agrees this is the work of John Gregory Hancock (I agree), it is signed "Wyan" at the base of the obverse, perhaps to capitalize upon the famous name of "Wyon," Britain's greatest medallist of the era. 

 

This is a rare medal. There was one in the Ford Collection, a lovely bronze piece bought by a savvy collector in the October 2004 Ford V sale; if Ford had ever been offered a nice white metal one, he would have bought it. There is a pretty nice white metal piece in the Yale collection, though it is just white metal, not silvered white metal. A well worn one brought $500 hammer in an Internet auction nearly a decade ago, and we had a fairly scruffy one come through ANR when I was there almost as long ago. A specimen was in the 1882 Bushnell sale, and the ANS and British Museum both contain specimens, in white metal and bronze, respectively. Laurence Brown, in British Historical Medals, called bronze specimens RR and white metal ones R (as in Rare). This is the first example I've owned in either metal, and it's certainly the prettiest white metal one that's been on the market in quite some time.

Additional

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade RAW
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc Not Specified
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 12107

Related Blog Article(s)

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

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