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Sought-After Silver Washington Skull and Crossbones Medal

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Sought-After Silver Washington Skull and Crossbones Medal

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Details

1799 (1800) Washington Skull and Crossbones funeral medal. Silver. Baker-165A. VF-35 (PCGS). Holed, as issued. Perhaps the most sought-after and historically evocative of the Washington medals. Struck in Newburyport, Massachusetts by Jacob Perkins, the Skull and Crossbones medals were struck expressly for the February 11, 1800 Masonic procession in Boston, "attended by sixteen hundred brethren" according to W.S. Baker, who also noted that "original impressions in silver of these pieces are quite rare." Just two are known in gold, including the Norweb specimen that sold for more than a quarter-million dollars in 2006. These medals clearly saw use for decades after that funeral parade, and most are well worn, nicked and scratched, etc. This one is a deep gray, nearly charcoal, tone that bespeaks great originality. The hole is oval, suggesting a long era of use. The central reverse is typically the weakest part of the coin, a conspiracy of the shallowness of strike from being opposite the obverse portrait and the natural wear that occurs against the chest of the owner, but this piece retains each letter of the reverse legend and all of the elements of its design. Some little marks are seen, including a couple below the bust of Washington (where marks are seen on nearly all silver Skull and Crossbones medals for some reason), along a little rim nick at 3:00 on the obverse, also visible at 9:00 on the reverse. 

A different VF-35 (PCGS) specimen realized $27,348 in the January 2013 StacksBowers sale, while more recently a PCGS EF-40 brought nearly $50,000 in January 2014. 

Colonial coin collectors often see a fine Washington Funeral medal as an appropriate capstone to a collection of 18th century American coins; the 18th century essentially ended with Washington's passing. While Washington Funeral Urn medals share a history (and an obverse design), the Skull and Crossbones is both far rarer and far more evocative. One of just seven graded by PCGS, this is among the nicer ones to sell in the last decade.

Additional Information

Grading Service PCGS
Grade VF35
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc Circulated
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 29486970

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

Description

Details

1799 (1800) Washington Skull and Crossbones funeral medal. Silver. Baker-165A. VF-35 (PCGS). Holed, as issued. Perhaps the most sought-after and historically evocative of the Washington medals. Struck in Newburyport, Massachusetts by Jacob Perkins, the Skull and Crossbones medals were struck expressly for the February 11, 1800 Masonic procession in Boston, "attended by sixteen hundred brethren" according to W.S. Baker, who also noted that "original impressions in silver of these pieces are quite rare." Just two are known in gold, including the Norweb specimen that sold for more than a quarter-million dollars in 2006. These medals clearly saw use for decades after that funeral parade, and most are well worn, nicked and scratched, etc. This one is a deep gray, nearly charcoal, tone that bespeaks great originality. The hole is oval, suggesting a long era of use. The central reverse is typically the weakest part of the coin, a conspiracy of the shallowness of strike from being opposite the obverse portrait and the natural wear that occurs against the chest of the owner, but this piece retains each letter of the reverse legend and all of the elements of its design. Some little marks are seen, including a couple below the bust of Washington (where marks are seen on nearly all silver Skull and Crossbones medals for some reason), along a little rim nick at 3:00 on the obverse, also visible at 9:00 on the reverse. 

A different VF-35 (PCGS) specimen realized $27,348 in the January 2013 StacksBowers sale, while more recently a PCGS EF-40 brought nearly $50,000 in January 2014. 

Colonial coin collectors often see a fine Washington Funeral medal as an appropriate capstone to a collection of 18th century American coins; the 18th century essentially ended with Washington's passing. While Washington Funeral Urn medals share a history (and an obverse design), the Skull and Crossbones is both far rarer and far more evocative. One of just seven graded by PCGS, this is among the nicer ones to sell in the last decade.

Additional

Additional Information

Grading Service PCGS
Grade VF35
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc Circulated
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 29486970

Related Blog Article(s)

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

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John Kraljevich Americana