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1799 (1800) Washington Skull and Crossbones Funeral medal. White metal. Baker-165C, Fuld dies 1-A.1. VF Details, Graffiti (PCGS).

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1799 (1800) Washington Skull and Crossbones Funeral medal. White metal. Baker-165C, Fuld dies 1-A.1. VF Details, Graffiti (PCGS).

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Details

1799 (1800) Washington Skull and Crossbones Funeral medal. White metal. Baker-165C, Fuld Dies 1.-A.1. VF Details, Graffiti (PCGS). One of the renowned rarities in the early Washingtoniana series, a Funeral medal type missing from nearly every major collection of Washingtoniana sold. Fuld estimated that just 2 to 4 specimens of the Skull and Crossbones type exist in white metal. Hodder, in his cataloguing for the Ford Washingtoniana (Ford II, 2004), noted seeing just two specimens, namely the two Ford owned. The 1996 Stack's sale of the Steinberg Washingtoniana also included one, but Norweb lacked it, as did the Western Reserve Historical Society collection built by the Norwebs. The silver Skull and Crossbones medals, though quite rare, are no where near as rare as the white metal ones, yet a VG will now bring low five figures. The last gold example to sell was in the 2006 Norweb sale, which I catalogued when the firm was still American Numismatic Rarities; it was Stack's by the time the sale was printed. That piece passed a quarter million dollars. This one, once in the famous Ted Craige collection, is not quite as pretty as the Norweb specimen in gold, but nor is it so dear. PCGS has assessed its condition as VF Details (perhaps a bit generous), graffiti (perhaps a bit harsh, with just some old and blended scratches on the reverse, mostly at the weak center with a few passing through the skull). This piece was clearly worn for far longer than the duration of the Masonic Procession in Boston on February 11, 1800, for which this type was coined. The surfaces show even wear and scattered light marks from use; the hole has broken through the rim and has worn to a teardrop shape. The legends are entirely complete, even at the soft reverse center, and the skull and crossbones iconography is bold. Ted Craige paid $325 for this sometime in the 1960s; it brought over $3500 in the sale of his Washingtoniana and even that was too cheap. The Ford pieces, both high grade, brought $12,650 and $13,800 in 2004, but at least one has resold since at a price level close to twice that. As a general type (including the far more common Funeral Urn), the Washington Funeral medals are ranked as number 11 in the 100 Greatest American Medals and Tokens. Within that class, the Skull and Crossbones type finds itself on far more want lists, both for its evocative design and famed rarity. How many pieces in your collection can you put on a particular block of Boston at a particular time on February 11, 1800?

Additional Information

Grading Service PCGS GEN
Grade N/A
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc N/A
Grade Add On No
SKU or Cert # 26603240

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

Description

Details

1799 (1800) Washington Skull and Crossbones Funeral medal. White metal. Baker-165C, Fuld Dies 1.-A.1. VF Details, Graffiti (PCGS). One of the renowned rarities in the early Washingtoniana series, a Funeral medal type missing from nearly every major collection of Washingtoniana sold. Fuld estimated that just 2 to 4 specimens of the Skull and Crossbones type exist in white metal. Hodder, in his cataloguing for the Ford Washingtoniana (Ford II, 2004), noted seeing just two specimens, namely the two Ford owned. The 1996 Stack's sale of the Steinberg Washingtoniana also included one, but Norweb lacked it, as did the Western Reserve Historical Society collection built by the Norwebs. The silver Skull and Crossbones medals, though quite rare, are no where near as rare as the white metal ones, yet a VG will now bring low five figures. The last gold example to sell was in the 2006 Norweb sale, which I catalogued when the firm was still American Numismatic Rarities; it was Stack's by the time the sale was printed. That piece passed a quarter million dollars. This one, once in the famous Ted Craige collection, is not quite as pretty as the Norweb specimen in gold, but nor is it so dear. PCGS has assessed its condition as VF Details (perhaps a bit generous), graffiti (perhaps a bit harsh, with just some old and blended scratches on the reverse, mostly at the weak center with a few passing through the skull). This piece was clearly worn for far longer than the duration of the Masonic Procession in Boston on February 11, 1800, for which this type was coined. The surfaces show even wear and scattered light marks from use; the hole has broken through the rim and has worn to a teardrop shape. The legends are entirely complete, even at the soft reverse center, and the skull and crossbones iconography is bold. Ted Craige paid $325 for this sometime in the 1960s; it brought over $3500 in the sale of his Washingtoniana and even that was too cheap. The Ford pieces, both high grade, brought $12,650 and $13,800 in 2004, but at least one has resold since at a price level close to twice that. As a general type (including the far more common Funeral Urn), the Washington Funeral medals are ranked as number 11 in the 100 Greatest American Medals and Tokens. Within that class, the Skull and Crossbones type finds itself on far more want lists, both for its evocative design and famed rarity. How many pieces in your collection can you put on a particular block of Boston at a particular time on February 11, 1800?

Additional

Additional Information

Grading Service PCGS GEN
Grade N/A
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc N/A
Grade Add On No
SKU or Cert # 26603240

Related Blog Article(s)

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

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