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1757 Quaker Indian Peace medal. Original dies. Bronze. Julian IP-49, Betts-401.

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1757 Quaker Indian Peace medal. Original dies. Bronze. Julian IP-49, Betts-401.

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Details

1757 Quaker Indian Peace medal. Original dies. Bronze. Julian IP-49, Betts-401. Choice About Uncirculated. One of the most famous and important of all American medals, the 1757 Quaker Peace medal was just the second medal ever struck in what became the United States (following the 1756 Kittanning Destroyed medal, produced by the same die sinker and coiner). The dies for this medal made their way to the Philadelphia Mint shortly after the turn of the 19th century, by which time the importance of the original strikes of this Philadelphia-made medal had already been recognized. Those originals, struck in silver atop Spanish-American pillar dollars, were distributed by Pennsylvania Quakers to native Americans in the hopes of maintaining friendly (and profitable) relationships with the tribes during the French and Indian War. The US Mint first produced restrikes from this original set of dies in white metal, then began producing examples in bronze sometime in the mid-19th century. The dies did not survive the process: the obverse broke first, then bisected twice so that the central obverse was raised like the point of a pyramid, then the reverse broke, by which time planchets that resembled hockey pucks were required to obtain any central detail from these dies. This example is in a middle die state with a broken obverse that still shows good central detail and an intact reverse. The bronzing is attractive and the preservation is excellent, with just a few dull reverse marks clustered above the seated Quaker. While it is impossible to date these precisely, this one likely dates from the 1860s or so.

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade RAW
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc Not Specified
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 820

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Description

Details

1757 Quaker Indian Peace medal. Original dies. Bronze. Julian IP-49, Betts-401. Choice About Uncirculated. One of the most famous and important of all American medals, the 1757 Quaker Peace medal was just the second medal ever struck in what became the United States (following the 1756 Kittanning Destroyed medal, produced by the same die sinker and coiner). The dies for this medal made their way to the Philadelphia Mint shortly after the turn of the 19th century, by which time the importance of the original strikes of this Philadelphia-made medal had already been recognized. Those originals, struck in silver atop Spanish-American pillar dollars, were distributed by Pennsylvania Quakers to native Americans in the hopes of maintaining friendly (and profitable) relationships with the tribes during the French and Indian War. The US Mint first produced restrikes from this original set of dies in white metal, then began producing examples in bronze sometime in the mid-19th century. The dies did not survive the process: the obverse broke first, then bisected twice so that the central obverse was raised like the point of a pyramid, then the reverse broke, by which time planchets that resembled hockey pucks were required to obtain any central detail from these dies. This example is in a middle die state with a broken obverse that still shows good central detail and an intact reverse. The bronzing is attractive and the preservation is excellent, with just a few dull reverse marks clustered above the seated Quaker. While it is impossible to date these precisely, this one likely dates from the 1860s or so.

Additional

Additional Information

Grading Service RAW
Grade RAW
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc Not Specified
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 820

Related Blog Article(s)

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

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