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Well Struck 1620 Dutch Rixdollar

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Well Struck 1620 Dutch Rixdollar

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Details

Netherlands, Utrecht. 1620 rixdollar. Davenport-4836. EF-45 (NGC). A particularly nice example of the Dutch answer to the 8 reales. Rixdollars (as they were called in the English-speaking world, a corruption of rijksdaalder) were finer and heavier than the Lion dollars that were mostly exported for trade. While Lion dollars are the large coins most associated with New Netherlands (and they were there, in substantial quantity), rixdollars were in colonial New York as well. The 1651 estate inventory of Jan Jansen Damen, who was perhaps the first Dutchman to own the site that later became the World Trade Center, lists "six rixdollars" among other coins such as "five pieces of eight," "one ducatoon," "37 quarter pieces of eight," and 275 florin in wampum. That document, among others translated from the original Dutch and published by the Holland Society of New York, is a goldmine of historical references to money in New Amsterdam and elsewhere in Dutch America. Rixdollars were a preferred coin of the realm in real estate transactions, for instance, in 1645 a piece of land on the East River was sold for the consideration of 1125 guilders to be paid "one half in rixdollars or pieces of eight" and the other half in "choice sewan (wampum) or store goods at market price." Another estate inventory from Pavonia in modern-day Hudson County, New Jersey dated 1641 lists "1 Jacobus," an English gold coin of James I, "17 rixdollars," and "a single dollar at 30 stivers," i.e. a Lion dollar. 

Rixdollars, like Lion dollars, tend to be poorly struck, and examples in the modern market place rarely boast full designs or nice surfaces. This example shows both, with full peripheral legends, good central designs, and attractive light golden toning. While I seem to always have a nice Lion dollar or two in stock (sometimes more!), I rarely see rixdollars that meet my quality requirements. This one certainly does.

Additional Information

Grading Service NGC
Grade XF45
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc Circulated
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 37557170014

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

Description

Details

Netherlands, Utrecht. 1620 rixdollar. Davenport-4836. EF-45 (NGC). A particularly nice example of the Dutch answer to the 8 reales. Rixdollars (as they were called in the English-speaking world, a corruption of rijksdaalder) were finer and heavier than the Lion dollars that were mostly exported for trade. While Lion dollars are the large coins most associated with New Netherlands (and they were there, in substantial quantity), rixdollars were in colonial New York as well. The 1651 estate inventory of Jan Jansen Damen, who was perhaps the first Dutchman to own the site that later became the World Trade Center, lists "six rixdollars" among other coins such as "five pieces of eight," "one ducatoon," "37 quarter pieces of eight," and 275 florin in wampum. That document, among others translated from the original Dutch and published by the Holland Society of New York, is a goldmine of historical references to money in New Amsterdam and elsewhere in Dutch America. Rixdollars were a preferred coin of the realm in real estate transactions, for instance, in 1645 a piece of land on the East River was sold for the consideration of 1125 guilders to be paid "one half in rixdollars or pieces of eight" and the other half in "choice sewan (wampum) or store goods at market price." Another estate inventory from Pavonia in modern-day Hudson County, New Jersey dated 1641 lists "1 Jacobus," an English gold coin of James I, "17 rixdollars," and "a single dollar at 30 stivers," i.e. a Lion dollar. 

Rixdollars, like Lion dollars, tend to be poorly struck, and examples in the modern market place rarely boast full designs or nice surfaces. This example shows both, with full peripheral legends, good central designs, and attractive light golden toning. While I seem to always have a nice Lion dollar or two in stock (sometimes more!), I rarely see rixdollars that meet my quality requirements. This one certainly does.

Additional

Additional Information

Grading Service NGC
Grade XF45
Designation N/A
Mint Location N/A
Strike Type N/A
Circulated/Uncirc Circulated
Grade Add On N/A
SKU or Cert # 37557170014

Related Blog Article(s)

Listed below are blog articles related to this product listing, if applicable:

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